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Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Pattern: Gail's Easy Cable Scarf

Here's an easy cable scarf to match last month's hat. Both are dedicated to Gail, the former listmom of Knit-U and Knit Design, who passed away suddenly after an illness. She will be missed by many knitters around the globe.

Size

Approx 6" (15 cm) wide by 64" (162 cm) long, without fringe

Gauge

27 sts = approx 5" unstretched and unblocked in Cable Rib patt

Materials

Yarn: 369 yards (326m) of chunky weight yarn. I used 3 balls of Plymouth Galway Chunky (100% wool, 100 grams = 123 yards per ball), 1 ball each in MC (turquoise), A (green) and B (hot pink). For a machine washable scarf, Plymouth Encore Chunky or Lion Brand Wool-Ease Chunky would work well.

Knitting needles: Size 10 (6mm) needles

Cable needle and tapestry needle

If you've never knitted cables before, check out this quick lesson.










Instructions

Body

With MC, CO 27 sts.

Rows 1 and 5 (RS): *(K1, p1) 3 times; k4 for cable, p1, (k1, p1) 3 times, k4 for cable, (p1, k1) 3 times.

Rows 2, 4 and 6: Work in patt as est, knitting the knits and purling the purls.

Row 3: (K1, p1) 3 times, sl 2 sts to cable needle and hold to back, k2, k2 from cable needle, p1, (k1, p1) 3 times, sl 2 sts to cable needle and hold to back, k2, k2 from cable needle, (p1, k1) 3 times.

Repeat rows 1 - 6 another 4 times with MC.

Change to A. Rep rows 1 - 6 another 5 times.

Change to B. Rep rows 1 - 6 another 5 times.

Rep stripe pattern, working 5 repeats of Cable Rib patt with MC, A, and B another 2 times, then work 5 repeats of Cable Rib patt with MC.

BO all sts.

Finishing

Weave in ends.

Use remaining yarn to attach fringe to ends of scarf.

Wash and dry flat, stretching scarf to measure 6-7" (15-18 cm) wide, and pinning in place to open up ribbing if desired.

Posted by Donna at 2:04 PM
Categories: Patterns

Friday, November 23, 2007

Pattern: Gail's Easy Cable Ski Cap

Here's an easy cable ski cap that is dedicated to Gail, the former listmom of Knit-U and Knit Design. Gail was a very generous soul who gave of her time voluntarily on both lists, and she also was a strong supporter of charity knitter. She passed away recently after an illness and she will be missed by many knitters around the globe.

Ususally I make hats in the round but I knit this one back and forth for those of you who don't like circular and double-pointed needles. It knits up quickly in chunky yarn on size 10 needles. Check back next month for a matching scarf.

Size

Adult, fits heads up to 22" (56cm) in circumference

16" (41cm) circumference, unstretched

Gauge

One 11-st repeat of Cable & Rib patt = 2 1/2" (6.35cm) wide unstretched, cap stretches a lot as shown in the photos

Materials

Yarn: 123 yards (112m) of chunky weight yarn. I used 1 ball of Plymouth Galway Chunky (100% wool, 100 grams = 123 yards per ball). For a machine washable hat, Plymouth Encore Chunky or Lion Brand Wool-Ease Chunky would work well.

Knitting needles: Size 10 (6mm) needles

Cable needle and tapestry needle



Cable & Rib Pattern (multiple of 11+1)

If you've never knitted cables before, check out this quick lesson.

Rows 1 and 5 (RS): *P1, k4, (p1, k1) 3 times; rep from * to last st, p last st.

Rows 2, 4 and 6: Work in patt as est, knitting the knits and purling the purls.

Row 3: *P1, sl 2 sts to cable needle and hold to back, k2, k2 from cable needle, (p1, k1) 3 times; rep from * to last st, p last st.

Repeat rows 1 - 6 for patt.



Instructions

Body

CO 67 sts.

Work in Cable & Rib patt until cap measures approx 6 3/4" (17cm) long, end after working row 6 of Cable & Rib patt.

Crown

Next row (RS): *P1, k1, k2tog, k1, p1, k1, slip 2 kw, k1, p2sso, k1; rep from * to last st, p last st.

Work 3 rows in patt as est (k3, p1 ribbing).

Next row (RS): *P1, slip 2 kw, k1, p2sso; rep from * to last st, p last st.

Work 3 rows in patt as est (k1, p1 ribbing).

Next row (RS): K2tog across to last st, k1.

Finishing

Cut yarn leaving a 6" (15cm) tail. Run tail through rem sts and pull tight to draw the top of the hat together.

Sew side seam. Weave in ends.

If desired, make pom-pom and sew to top of hat.

Posted by Donna at 3:16 PM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, September 02, 2007

Pattern: 100 Meter Dash Hat

Hi everyone. Don't faint! I have a pattern to post. I feel terrible that I haven't had time to keep this site up to date all year, but I'm working on some major life changes so next year I will have more time to work on this. It will be totally revamped, as well. I hope you'll all enjoy it. In the meantime, here's a quick hat that takes 1 ball of yarn with 100 meters (109 yards). You can probably make it in one evening. It took me about 90 minutes.

Size

Women's medium, ribbing is about 18" in circumference and very stretch.



Gauge

12 sts = 4 inches (10 cm) over stockinette stitch, knit in the round.

Materials

Yarn: 100 meters (109 yards) of bulky weight yarn. I used Plymouth Confusion, a new concotion that is made up of short lenghts of all kinds of fun yarns tied together into one ball. It's a brand new yarn, and I don't think it'll be availble until fall. Is it fall yet? I'm not sure. It's still pretty darn hot here.

Knitting needles: Size 9 (5.5mm) circular needle 16-inches (41-cm) long, and double-pointed needles, or size required to get the right gauge.

(If you hate dpns, try knitting on 2 circulars or using the magic loop technique with a long circular needle. Unfortunately, I don't have time to write up lessons for these techniques right now, but if you click on those links, you'll find some very good instructions for both techniques.)

Notions: stich marker, tapestry needle.



Instructions

Brim

Cast on 60 sts. Place marker and join to knit in the round being careful not to twist sts.

Rnd 1: (K1, P1) around.

Continue in K1, P1 ribbing for 1 1/2 inches (about 4 cm).



Body

Increase rnd: *K5, knit in front and back of next st (1 st increased); rep from * around--70 sts.

Knit every rnd until you have about 10 yards (9 meters) of yarn remaining. Hat should measure about 9" from cast-on edge.



Crown

Next rnd: K2tog around--35 sts remain.

Knit 2 rounds even. Change to double-pointed needles.

Next rnd: K2tog around to last st, knit last st--18 sts remain.

Knit 1 round even.

Next rnd: K2tog around--9 sts remain.

Cut yarn leaving a 6 inch (15 cm) tail. Thread tail onto a tapestry needle and run it through the remaining sts. Pull tight to fasten off.

Weave in ends.

Posted by Donna at 2:00 PM
Categories: Patterns

Monday, April 30, 2007

Pattern: Easy Moss Stitch Shrug

As promised, I do actually have some knitting content this month! If you haven't had time to read any of the guest posts about Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I hope you will scroll down in the April 2007 archives and think about how you can help reduce the incidence of sexual assault in your community.

I designed this shrug because I thought it would be a good garment to donate to womens' shelters. It is one-size fits all, so it's great for donations when you don't know the size of the recipient. It also is flattering on any figure, and even fits well during pregnancy. You can also make different lengths for people with long or short arms. Women in shelters need any comfort they can get -- emotional, spiritual, mental, and physical. Just like a comfort shawl, a hand-knitted shrug can be endowed with love and support by the knitter, and makes a wonderful gift for someone who has been the victim of abuse or of unlucky circumstances.

I got the idea for this design when I went to the Denver Knitting Guild meeting last month. One of the disucssion topics was charity knitting, and the group was looking for patterns for shrugs that they could knit for women who were hospitalized. Those flimsy gowns never have long sleeves, and for some reasons Doctors like to keep places cold. (Because they have to wear long sleeves and ties under those lab coats? Maybe they should all swtich to scrubs!). Shrugs are great hospital keep-warm garments, because they can usually even be warn when you have an IV.

Materials

Approx 615 yards of bulky weight wool or wool-blend yarn

I used 5 balls of Plymouth's Galway Chunky (100% wool, 100 grams = 123 yards per ball) in color 722, oatmeal. For a machine washable gift, I suggest Plymouth's Encore Chunky.

Size 10U.S. needles

Crochet hook in a size close to the knitting needle size (optional)

Tapestry needle

Gauge

Approx 3.5 sts = 1" over Moss Stitch

Size

One size fits all. Approx 17" wide by 48" to 60" long.

Note that a person's arm span is approximately the same as their height. If you are making this as a gift for an unknown recipient, go for the longer length just to be safe.

Instructions

Cuff

Cast on 26 sts.

Work in K2, P2 ribbing as follows:

Row 1 (RS): K2, *P2, K2; rep from * across.

Row 2 (WS): P1, *K2, P2; rep from * across.

Continue in ribbing as est until cuff measures approx 3" or desired length. End after completing a WS row.

Next row (RS): Knit in the front and back of every stitch--52 sts.

Next row (WS): Knit.

Next row: Knit, increasing 8 sts spread out across the row--60 sts.

Next row: Knit.

Sleeves and Body

Work in Moss Stitch as follows:

Rows 1 and 2: *K1, P1; rep from * across.

Rows 3 and 4: *P1, K1; rep from * across.

Continue in Moss stitch until piece measures from 45" to 57" from CO edge. End after completing a RS row.

Cuff

Next row (WS): Knit.

Next row (RS): Knit, decreasing 8 sts spread out across the row--52 sts.

Next row: Knit.

Next row: K2tog across--26 sts.

Work in K2, P2 ribbing as for first cuff.

When 2nd cuff is the same length as the first cuff, BO loosely in pattern.

Finishing

Sew cuffs and 1" of arm closed, as shown in photo.

If desired, work one row of single crochet along open edges of shrug. This creates a smooth chain along the edge of the piece.

Wash and dry flat.

Posted by Donna at 2:13 PM
Categories: Patterns

Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Pattern: Fingerless Gloves for Hand Health

fingerless gloves I made these fingerless gloves to cover up the ugly Handeze therapeutic gloves I wear now whenever I work on the computer. These also make good gifts, for friends, loved ones, or as donations to homeless shelters or any place that collects warm woolies for those in needs. I especially like the idea of giving pretty gifts like these to single moms at the holidays. Chances are they've spent any spare change the could dig up on gifts for their children, and didn't have a dime left to treat themselves to an ounce of luxury.

Size

Women's S (M, L), to snugly fit a hand that measures 7 (7.5, 8) inches around the base of the fingers, just above the crotch of the thumb.

Finished Measurements

5.5 (6.5, 7) inch circumference

These gloves should fit snugly. If you'd like them to be a bit looser, go up a needle size and work at a slightly looser gauge.

Materials

Approx 150 yards of worsted weight wool or wool blend yarn.

A small amount of faux fur yarn, 12 or 15 yards should be ample.

I used Plymouth Galway Worsted (100% Wool, 210 yds/100g ball) and Furlauro (100% Nylon, 82 yds/50g ball)

Set of 4 or 5 size 8 U.S. double pointed needles

Gauge

5 sts = 1 inch over St st using worsted-weight wool yarn

Cuff

With fur, CO 28 (32, 36) sts. Distribute sts evenly on 3 dpns. Join to knit in the round, being careful not to twist sts. Use yarn tail to keep track of the end of the rnds.

K 3 rnds.

Change to wool yarn and beging 1x1 twisted rib patt as follows:

Rnd 1: *K1 through back loop to twist stitch, purl 1. Rep from * around.

Rep rnd 1 for patt.

Work in rib as est until cuff meas 2 1/2 inches or desired length to wrist.

glove on hand Hand and Thumb Gore

Change to St st and AT THE SAME TIME begin thumb gore as follows:

Rnd 1: K1, p1, m1, k1, m1, p1, k to end of round.

Rnd 2: K1, p1, k to next p, p1, k to end of round.

Rnd 3: K1, p1, m1, k to next p, m1, p1, k to end of rnd.

Rep rnds 2 and 3 until you have 9 (9, 11) sts between purls.

Work even in St st, maintaining columns of purls on the sides of the thumb gore as est until hand reaches the crotch of your thumb. Glove should measure approx 5 (5.5, 6)" from CO edge.

Place 2 purls and 9 (9, 11) thumb gore sts on a piece of scrap yarn. CO 3 sts over gap and knit 4 rnds in St st.

Change to 1x1 twisted rib. Work 6 rnds of twisted rib. BO loosely.

Thumb

Put 11 (11, 13) sts on hold for thumb onto dpns. Pick up 3 sts over gap at base of thumb--14 (14, 16) sts.

Knit 1 rnd, decreasing 2 sts--12 (12, 14) sts.

Work 6 rnds of 1x1 twisted rib. BO loosely.

Weave in ends, closing holes at sides of the base of the thumb if necessary.

Posted by Donna at 4:01 PM
Categories: Patterns

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Pattern: Aunt Phebe's Comfort Shawl

I made this shawl for a friend whose son recently died. She is 80 and he was 50, but that doesn't make the loss of a child any less tragic or distressing. I hope this shawl brings her some iota of comfort.

Size: Approx 28 inches long by 66 inches wide

Gauge: Approx 8 sts = 4"/10cm

Exact gauge is not critical. Make sure the fabric is light and airy. The shawl should be like a cloud.

Skill Level: Easy

Yarn: 1 skein of Plymouth Yarn's Outback Mohair (70% Mohair, 26% Wool, 4% Nylon, 218 yds/100g skein)

Needles: Size 15 circular needle, at least 24" long

Instructions

CO 7 sts.

Begin Garter Stitch Pattern

Row 1: K2, yo, knit to end of row (8 sts).

Put a safety pin on this row to mark the right side (RS).

Repeat row 1 until you have have used up approx half of the yarn. Piece should measure approx 20 inches long. End after working a WS row.

Begin Eyelet Pattern

Row 1 (RS): K2, yo, k1, (yo, k2tog) to last 3 sts, k3.

If you have an extra plain stitch at the end of the row before the last 3 sts, don't worry. Just knit it. This pattern is very forgiving and you should not get stressed out over having an extra stitch! I had one a couple of times on my shawl, but I couldn't find any mistakes after I finished knitting and examined the shawl.

Rows 2, 3, and 4: K2, yo, knit to end of row.

Repeat rows 1 to 4 until you have approx 12 yards of yarn remaining. End after a plain row.

(Design tip: If you prefer, switch back to plain garter stitch in the center after working 5 or 6 eyelet rows. This will create a solid border at the top edge of the shawl.)

Finishing

BO loosely. Weave in ends.

There is no need to block this shawl. Wash and lay flat to dry, if desired.

Posted by Donna at 8:56 AM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, November 26, 2006



Pattern: Easy-Eyes scarf for carry-around knitting - by Alison Hyde

This is the perfect scarf for peaceful knitting. The stitch pattern is so simple, you'll likely memorize it even before you start knitting.

Cast on an odd number of stitches in a yarn and needle size that you like together. The sample shown here and on my website, spindyeknit.com was made with Soft Baby from Rowan. I cast on 13 stitches using size 11 (6.5 mm) needles. I made a second version in a variegated color of Suri Dream from Knit Picks that shows the versatility of this easy pattern, but unfortunately blogger ate the only photo.

Exact guage is not important, but the fabric should be light and airy, not tight and stiff.

Row 1 and all wrong side rows: Purl.

Row 2: *K2tog, yo, rep from * across; end k1.

Row 4: K1, *yo, ssk, rep from * to end of row.

Bind off loosely and block to open up the lace.

(Note: See this month's knitting lessons for a stretcy bind off and tips on blocking lace.)

Posted by Donna at 7:53 AM
Categories: Patterns

Tuesday, August 29, 2006



Pattern: Kid's Felt & Fur Mittens

I love felting and I love knitting mittens. For a few years, I made at least 2 pairs of mittens every month and gave them away as gifts and donated them to charities and for silent auctions to raise money for several different causes. Now I've switched to jam for my gift giving, but mittens are still better for charity donations. Making mittens is quite addicting. Once you get started, you'll be looking for new patterns everywhere. (I've gathered an embarassingly large collection of mitten books over the past few years!)

This pair, made on large needles with fewer than 40 sts, can be made in one evening while watching TV. It's great practice using double-pointed needles, and they go a lot more quickly than socks! If you've never made mittens before, felted mittens are great for learning because any mistakes you might make will disappear when you throw the mittens in the washing machine to shrink.

Sizes

Child's 4 (6, 8, 10)

Approx 7 1/2 (9, 9 1/2, 10)" long and 3 1/4 (3 1/2, 4, 4 1/2)" wide before felting

Approx 6 1/2 (7 1/2, 8, 9)" long and 2 3/4 (3, 3 1/2, 4)" wide after felting

Exact size is determined by felting process.

Needles

Size 10 U.S. double pointed needles, or size to obtain gauge

Size 8 U.S. double pointed needles for cuffs

Yarn

MC (wool): Approx 200 yards of worsted weight yarn will make 2 or more pairs of mittens, depending on size. You must use wool yarn or a blend of wool and mohair or alpaca. Do not use synthetic or "superwash" wool yarn or your mittens will not felt!

CC (fur): Approx 80 yards of faux fur yarn will be enough to make the cuffs on several pairs of mittens.

I used Plymouth Galway Worsted (100% Wool - Worsted Weight, 5 sts = 1"/US8 needle / 210 yds/100g ball) and Furlauro (100% Nylon, 3.5 sts = 1"/US 10.5 needle / 82 yds/50g ball).

Gauge

Approx 3 1/2 to 4 sts = 1 inch over stockinette stitch (knit every round) before felting. Exacxt gauge is not critical. Make sure your stitches are loose and airy. If your knitting is too tight, your mittens won't felt as quickly.

Instructions

With smaller needles and one strand of wool and one strand of fur held tog, CO 20 (24, 28, 32) sts. Arrange sts evenly on 3 dpns. Join, being careful not to twist sts, to knit in the round. Use the yarn tail from the CO to keep track of the beginning of the round.

Cuff Ribbing

Round 1: (K1, P1) around.

Continue in K1, P1 ribbing as est until cuff measures 1 3/4 (2 1/4, 2 1/2, 3) inches.

Cut fur yarn.

Work 3 more rounds of ribbing.

Change to larger needles and St st (knit every round). On first round, increase 4 sts evenly around. 24 (28, 32, 36) sts.

Thumb Gore

Increase round: P1, inc 1, k1, inc 1, p1, knit to end of round.

Next round: P1, knit to next purl, p1, knit to end of round.

Repeat the last 2 rounds until you have 7 (7, 9, 11) sts between the purls.

Work even until piece measures 3 1/2 (4 1/2, 4 3/4, 5) inches from CO edge.

On next round, put the sts between the purls on hold. CO 1 st over gap at thumb. Join and knit to end of round. 24 (28, 32, 36) sts.

Hand

Knit every round until piece measures 5 3/4 (7 1/4, 8, 8 1/2) inches from CO edge.

Finger Tips

Arrange sts evenly on 3 needles with 8 (9, 10, 12) sts on each needle.

Decrease round: On each needle, K2tog, knit to last 2 sts on needle, k2tog.

Knit 2 rounds even.

Repeat the last 3 rounds until fewer than 10 sts remain.

Cut yarn, thread tail through remaining sts, pull tight, and fasten off.

Thumb

Place thumb sts on 2 dpn. PU 3 sts from CO edge at top of thumb hole, using a third needle. 10 (10, 12, 14) sts.

Knit even until thumb measures 1 1/2 (1 3/4, 2 1/4, 2 1/2) inches.

K2tog around. 5 (5, 6, 7) sts rem.

Cut yarn, thread tail through remaining sts, pull tight, and fasten off.

Finishing

Weave in ends, closing up any holes around the base of the thumb.

Felt (see felting lesson for instructions).

Posted by Donna at 7:57 AM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, July 30, 2006



Two Dishrag Patterns

 These dishrags or wascloths are so easy to knit, you can make several in one afternoon. Both are made diagonally, knitted from one point to another, in plain garter stitch. Yarn overs and simple decreases form the shaping. The blue version is made from plain cotton, with the increases worked right on the edge for a lacy border. The white version is made out of a terry-cloth novelty yarn with the increases worked a couple of stitches in from the edge.


Version 1: Blue Cotton

This version has yarn overs along the edge of the piece, making a lacy border.

Worsted weight cotton yarn (one 50 gram skein will make 2 cloths )

5mm (Size 8 US) knitting needles

CO 5 sts.

Increase section: YO, knit to end.

Repeat until the dishrag is half of the desired size.

Decrease section: YO, k2tog, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1.

Repeat until 5 sts remain.

BO. Weave in ends. Use right away in lieu of blocking.


Version 2: White Terry Cloth

This version has the yarn overs in a couple of stitches, making a firmer border.

Worsted weight terry-cloth novelty yarn (one 50 gram skein will make 2 cloths), if you find a thinner terry-textured yarn, you can use it double.

5mm (Size 8 US) knitting needles

CO 5 sts.

Increase section: K2, YO, knit to end.

Repeat until the dishrag is half of the desired size.

Decrease section: K1, k2tog, YO, k2tog, knit to end.

Repeat until 5 sts remain.

BO. Weave in ends. Use right away in lieu of blocking.

Posted by Donna at 6:59 AM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, May 28, 2006



Pattern: Comfort Shawl

This beautiful shawl is made from one large skein of wool and one large skein of mohair. The shawl is soft and cuddly and would be a wonderful gift for any woman who has suffered from a recent crisis or loss. The lace pattern is easy to memorize and works up quickly on size 11 needles.

 

Size

One size

Approx 25 x 67 inches

 

Materials

Yarn A: 370 yards of chunky weight wool yarn

Yarn B: 218 yards of bulky brushed mohair yarn

I used one skein each of Plymouth Outback Mohair (70% Mohair, 26% Wool, 4% Nylon, 218 yds/100g skein) and Outback Wool (100% Virgin Wool, 370 yds/200g skein)

Knitting needles:

Size 11 (8mm) needles or size to obtain gauge

Spare needle or scrap yarn to use as a stitch holder

Extra size 11 (8mm) needle for joining pieces together

Tapestry needle

 

Gauge

One 15 stitch pattern repeat = approx 5 1/2" wide before blocking

Don't worry about the gauge too much. If your stitches are light and airy, your shawl will be wonderful when you block it.

 

Special Stitch

Double Decrease (ddec)

1. Slip 2 stitches together as if to knit.

2. Knit the next stitch.

3. Pass the 2 slipped stitches over the stitch just knitted and drop them off the needle as when binding off.

Three stitches have been decreased to one stitch.

 

Shawl

The shawl is made in two separate pieces, so both ends have a cast-on edge. After the knitting is complete, the two pieces are bound off together.

 

Side 1

With A, cast on 70 sts as follows:

CO 5, pm, (CO 15, pm) 4 times, CO 5.

 

Begin pattern stitch

With A:

Rows 1 to 4: Knit.

Row 5 (RS): K5, sm, (k1, yo, k5, ddec, k5, yo k1, sm) 4 times, k5.

Row 6 (WS): K5, sm, purl to last marker, sm, k5.

Rows 7 to 14: Repeat rows 5 and 6.

With B:

Rows 15 to 18: Knit.

Rows 19 to 26: Repeat rows 5 and 6.

Repeat rows 1 to 26 of pattern 4 times total. Then knit 4 rows with wool yarn. The last row should be a WS row. Do not bind off.

Put stitches on a spare needle or a piece of yarn. Set aside.

 

Side 2

Work as for side one.

Continue to knit in garter stitch (knit every row) with wool yarn until approx 6 yards of yarn remains. End with a WS row. Do not bind off.

 

Finishing

With right sides together, join ends with three needle bind off, making sure to work loosely (use a larger needle if necessary).

Weave in ends.

Wet shawl in washing machine and spin out excess water. Place on a flat surface and shape into a rectangle, pulling down on each point on the ends. Pin in place and allow to air dry.

Posted by Donna at 11:42 AM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, April 30, 2006



Garter Stitch Pet Shelter Blanket

This easy blanky is the perfect way to add a bit of comfort to the life of a cat or dog in an animal shelter. When they find a new home, they can take the blanket home with them to help in the transition to an unfamiliar environment.

 

Size

Small (Large)

22x22 (33x33) inches

 

Materials

320 (640) yards of super bulky weight wool blend machine washable yarn divided in 2 colors.You will need 1 extra ball of the CC for the optional I-cord edging. The sample blanket is made with Plymouth Encore Mega with burgundy as the MC and black as the CC.

Knitting needles:

Size 11 (8mm) needles or size to obtain gauge

Two size 11 (8mm) double pointed needles for optional I-cord edging.

Tapestry needle

 

Gauge

Approx 2 sts and 4 rows = 1" in garter stitch (knit every row)

 

Blanket

Note: Each ridge in garter stitch is made from 2 rows of knitting.

Square 1

CO 24 (36) sts with MC. Work in the following stripe pattern until you have 24 (36) garter ridges: Knit 2 rows with MC, knit 2 rows with CC. Bind off.

 

Square 2

On the left edge of square 1 with RS facing you, pick up 24 (36) sts with MC. This counts as the first row.

Work in the following stripe pattern until you have 24 (36) garter ridges: Knit 8 (12) ridges in MC, 8 (12) ridges in CC, 8 (12) ridges in MC.

Bind off.

 

Square 3

On the left edge of square 2 with RS facing you, pick up 24 (36) sts with MC.

Work as for square 1.

 

Square 4

On the left edge of square 3 with RS facing you, pick up 24 (36) sts with MC.

Work as for square 2.

 

Finishing

With WS facing you, sew edge of square 1 to edge of square 4.

If desired, add I-cord edging. With CC, work 1 row of 4 stitch applied I-cord around the entire edge of the blanket as follows:

Using double pointed needles, cast on 4 sts.

Insert the tip of the right needle into the first stitch on the edge of the blanket. Slide the 5 sts to the other end of the dpn.

*K3, k2tog through the back loops (1 I-cord stitch and 1 blanket stitch).

Insert the tip of the right needle into the first stitch on the edge of the blanket. Slide the 5 sts to the other end of the dpn.

Repeat from * until all sts have been worked.

Bind off. Sew the ends of the I-cord together. Weave in ends.

Posted by Donna at 10:57 AM
Categories: Patterns



Garter Stitch Dog Jacket by Annie Modesitt

Guest designer Annie Modesitt has contributed this cute garter stitch dog jacket pattern. Annie is working on a book called Men Who Knit (and The Dogs Who Love Them...). Keep your eyes open for it at your local yarn shop later this year, but in the meantime, you can get a sneak peek on Annie’s web site.

I don’t have a dog, so I made the second smallest size of the sweater. I thought I’d be able to try it on one of my cats for a photo, but they weren’t very cooperative. So the photo just shows the sweater flat. I’ve also included a drawing that Annie made to give you a rough idea what this looks like on a dog.

Thanks, Annie!

 

Size

Girth: 8.5 (11.75, 15, 18, 21.25, 24.5, 27.75, 31) inches

Measure the dog's chest around the widest point to determine the girth. If you're still not sure what size to make, Annie's provided a chart to help you select the right size for your dog. Scroll down to the bottom of the pattern to see it.

 

Materials

315 (315, 315, 475, 475 , 475, 630, 630) yards of chunky weight wool blend yarn. The sample sweater is made with Plymouth Encore Chunky.

Knitting needles:

Size 7 (4.5mm) circular needle in a length a bit longer than the girth for the size you are making or size to obtain gauge

One piece of 1/2 inch-wide Velcro, 7.75 (10.5, 13.5, 16.5, 19.5, 22.25, 25, 28) inches long

3.75mm (Size F-5 U.S) crochet hook (optional)

Darning needle for weaving in ends

 

Gauge

4 sts and 6 rows = 1" in garter stitch (knit every row)

 

Body

If desired, cast on and work the first 2 rows with a contrasting color, then work the body in a solid color or in any stripe pattern. I changed colors after every 2 rows of knitting and did not cut the yarn after each stripe because I hate weaving in so many ends.

Cast on 19 (25, 31, 37, 45, 51, 57, 63) sts.

Knit 2 rows.

Cont in st garter stitch, inc 3 sts at start of next 2 rows—25 (31, 37, 43, 51, 57, 63, 69) sts.

Inc 1 st at start of every row 10 (18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 50, 56) times—35 (49, 61, 73, 87, 99, 113, 125) sts.

If necessary, work even until piece measures 4.5 (6.25, 8, 9.5, 11.25, 13, 14.75, 16.5) inches from cast on edge. End with a WS row.

 

Armhole Shaping

Bind off 8 (10, 13, 16, 20, 23, 25, 28) sts from start of next 2 rows, then bind off 1 st at start of next 2 (4, 4, 4, 6, 6, 8, 8) rows—17 (25, 31, 37, 41, 47, 55, 61) sts remain.

Work even with no shaping for 0 (0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.125, 1.625, 1.375, 1.875) inches.

Inc 1 st at start of next 2 (4, 4, 4, 6, 6, 8, 8) rows, then inc 4 (5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14) at start of next 2 rows—27 (39, 49, 57, 67, 77, 89, 97) sts.

 

Shoulder Shaping

BO 1 st at start of next 4 (8, 10, 10, 12, 14, 18, 18) rows, then BO 2 (2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5) sts at start of next 2 rows, then BO 1 (2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5) sts at start of next 2 rows—17 (23, 29, 35, 41, 47, 53, 59) sts rem.

 

Collar

If desired, work the collar in a contrasting color.

Inc 1 st each edge every row 5 times, then inc 1 st at start of every row 6 (6, 6, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10) times. Bind off all sts.

 

Finishing

If desired, with a contrasting color, work row of single crochet around entire edge of garment, working 3 sc stitches into each corner. Weave in ends.

Cut the Velcro into 2 pieces. One piece should fit on the edge between the armhole and the collar, and the other piece will go on the belly. Fit the sweater to your dog to determining the placement of the Velcro when the jacket is closed.  Hand or machine sew the Velcro to the sweater body.

Posted by Donna at 6:05 AM
Categories: Patterns

Friday, March 31, 2006



March Mini Update

I've been so busy this month that I almost forgot to post a monthly update! I didn't get a new project designed in time to add a pattern, but I do have a couple of updates.

Breast Cancer Charity Updates

My cousin, Emily Druchunas, is participating in the AVON Walk For Breast Cancer this October in New York City. Her mom had breast cancer and has been cancer-free for six years. Emily sent this email to me:

Hello friends and family!

I've recently been approached by a friend of mine with the brilliant idea of participating in the AVON Walk For Breast Cancer. As many of you may know my life was affected by breast cancer when my mom was diagnosed with it six years ago. Many of us know someone who has struggled with breast cancer, and the toll it took on their lives or someone close to them.

As it stands, I have registered myself as an AVON walker, but to participate in the 39.3 mile marathon I need to raise $1,800 by October of this year. I know it's a hefty sum, and that all of our pocketbooks are lighter these days, but if we could all pitch in a little then maybe we'll end up with a big ol' bundle. Every dime will get us another step closer to a cure (no pun intended...okay, well I am my fathers daughter too)! If I fail to make the goal of $1,800, whatever money we have raised will still go to Avon's cancer research, however I will not be able to join in the two day marathon in NYC. I'm hoping I'll be there with my running shoes on on October 7th and 8th, but I will need everyone's help.

I've never attempted anything like this before, and you all know me...I would never ask for help if it wasn't desperately needed or for something I care very deeply about. Please help me to help others.

donate to emily

If you know of anyone that would be interested in helping me achieve my goal would you please forward them this e-mail. You can visit my personal page that I have set up for myself. There you will be able to track my progress, read my reasons for participating and make a donation if you so choose. I'll keep it updated as often as possible with new information and pictures of me and my cohorts in training. Please don't be shy, pop in for a visit!

Thanks so much for your time and support.

I'd be thrilled if some Knitting for Change readers would contribute to help Emily reach her goal.


Knitty's Breast Cancer Awareness Mini-Issue. I didn't have time to get a new project finished for this month, but I found this fantastic Knitty mini-issue to support breast cancer awareness. The issue is a special PDF pattern booklet that you can download and print. It includes these patterns:

 


Stitch to WIN Against Breast Cancer (TNNA)

In 2004 at Mall of America in Minneapolis, MN, the National NeedleArts Association (TNNA) launched their program " Stitch to WIN Against Breast Cancer." Since then over 70 retailers have had events in their own communities. TNNA's charitable partner Living Beyond Breast Cancer is a Philadelphia based, national organization offering direct support, information, and education for breast cancer survivors and their families.

Last month, TNNA had a booth at the 6th Annual Conference for Young Women Affected by Breast Cancer in Denver, CO where over 650 women— breast cancer survivors, supporters and health professionals — came together in Denver CO to learn valuable information, gather support and share their incredible spirit.

From TNNA's press release:

TNNA shared the benefits and joy of needlearts with these courageous women, as well. Throughout the weekend, the Stitch to WIN Against Breast Cancer booth was surrounded by these new stitchers as they enjoyed learning to knit, crochet, needlepoint and cross stitch during their breaks from the scheduled programming. A few only needed a refresher course as they had learned to stitch as children at their grandmothers’ knees. Most always wanted to know how but had never had the opportunity. Each of them walked away with a smile and a new-found passion for the needlearts.

Many women stopped by the booth just to share their stories about how stitching helped them get through some very difficult times. They talked about the emotional, spiritual and therapeutic benefits of the needlearts – how their knitting or needlepoint kept their fingers nimble and their spirits up during the long hours of treatment.

Local retailers Carole Jacobs of Ewenique Yarns and Denise Seale and twin sister Danielle of Cherry Tree Needlepoint came and brought along volunteers from their shops to help support the event. Joined by Pam Aman, an independent Yarn Sales Rep based in Denver, these TNNA members and customers shared their time and needlearts talents with what seemed to be a never-ending stream of enthusiastic new stitchers. “I’m amazed by the energy and vitality of these courageous young women,” commented Carole. “ . . . and they’re taking to stitching with a real excitement and determination!”

Sherry Mulne, marketing consultant for TNNA, says, "I can't even begin to express the spirit of these events. I saw women crying (happy tears) about their newfound passion for the needlearts. I've been embraced by women and told how much we've enriched their lives. And I've heard amazing stories about how the needlearts have helped both patients and supporters get through terrible times."

The info on their website is a little out of date, but the program is going strong and there are more plans for events in 2006. Ask your LYS owner if they are a member of TNNA and find out if you can help bring a Stitch to WIN Against Breast Cancer event to your area.


Wednesday, February 22, 2006



Pattern: Condom Amulets

These condom amulets are fun and easy to make and they are great accessories to decorate your wardrobe and give you an easy way to help make a difference for good! Just tuck a couple of condoms into your amulet, and a couple of safe sex pamphlets into your purse, and you can give them out to anyone who asks about your amulet.

Here are a couple of sites that have PDF pamphlets you can download and print:

The Yiffy Guide to Safer Sex

Safe Sex and Condoms: Essential Facts













Materials

Less than 1 ball of worsted weight, chunky, or bulky yarn. (1 ball will make several amulets.)

Any type of yarn works. I used hemp, wool, ribbon, and novelty yarns for my amulets. If you choose a worsted weight yarn, use it double. Use chunky or bulky yarns single.

Size 9 knitting needles. Double-pointeds work great because these are so small.

Assorted beads for decoration.

Sewing needle and matching thread to attach beads.

Yarn, beads, or leather cord for strap.

 


Gauge

Don't worry about it. These projects are so quick to make! Just start one and knit 5 or 6 rows. If it looks too small or too big, rip it out and start over!


Size

2 or 3 inches square.


Instructions

Cast on 14, 16 or 18 sts.

Work every row in double knitting as follows:
*Knit 1 st, slip 1 st as if to purl with yarn in front. Rep from * to end of row. Turn.

When amulet measures 2 to 3 inches tall (depending on how big your condom packets are), separate the front and back stitches onto separate needles.

Bind off the front stitches.

For a flap, purl one RS row on the back sts for a turning ridge.

Continue to make the flap working back and forth in garter stitch (knit every row) or stockinette stitch (knit RS rows and purl WS rows), until flap is about 1 inch long.

Tip: you can also decrease on the sides of the flap on every other row to make a pointy flap instead of a squarish flap.

Bind off and weave in ends.

Use a crochet chain, a braid, a string of beads, or a strip of leather as a strap. Sew or tie the strap onto the sides of the top opening of the amulet.

Using a needle and thread sew beads onto the amulate to decorate as desired. Attaching beads to the edge of the flap will help keep the amulet closed.

 







Posted by Donna at 6:42 AM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, January 08, 2006



Pattern: Easy Cable Scarf and Headband

This easy scarf and headband will give you practice making cables. It's perfect for anyone needing a bit of warmth.

scarf and headband

Materials

Approx 440 yards of worsted weight yarn.  

I used 4 balls of Suri Merino from Plymouth yarn (55% suri alpaca, 45% extra fine merino wool), Color 5192

To make each separate item, you will need:

Scarf: 3 balls, size 7 needles

Headband: 1 ball, size 7 needles

 

Gauge

Approx 20 sts = 4 inches over stockinette stitch

Size

Headband: 18 inch circumference, fits head sizes up to 23 inches

Scarf: 5 inches wide x 58 inches long

 

Pattern Stitches

Rope Cable

Rows 1, 3 and 7 (RS): P2, k6, p2.

Rows 2, 4 and 6 (WS): K2, p6, k2.

Row 5: P2, slip 3 sts to cable needle (cn) and hold in front, k3, k3 from cn, p2.

Row 8: K2, p6, k2.

Repeat rows 1 to 8 for pattern.

 

Headband Instructions
headband
headband on cat

Cast on 16 sts.

Setup row (WS): K3, place marker, k2, p6, k2, place marker, k3.

Row 1: K3, sm, work rope cable over next 10 sts, sm, k3.

Repeat row 1 until headband measures approx. 18 inches. End after row 2 of rope cable pattern.

Bind off. Sew ends of headband together. Weave in ends.

 

Scarf Instructions

Cast on 36 sts.

Ribbing

Row 1 (RS): K3, place marker, (k2, p6, k2, place marker) three times, k3.

Row 2 (WS): K3, (p2, k6, p2) three times, k3, slipping markers when you come to them.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until ribbing measures 2 inches.

Knit 6 rows (3 garter ridges).

 

Cable Pattern

Next row (RS): K3, sm, work three repeats of rope cable over next 30 sts slipping the markers when you come to them, sm, k3.

Work patterns as established until scarf measures approx 55 inches. End after row 2 of rope cable pattern.

 

Ribbing

Knit 6 rows (3 garter ridges).

Repeat rows 1 and 2 of ribbing as above, until ribbing measures 2 inches.

Bind off loosely in pattern and weave in ends. Wash the scarf and dry flat, flaring the ends out to create the clamshell shape of the ribbing.

Posted by Donna at 8:49 AM
Categories: Patterns

Tuesday, December 20, 2005



Pattern: Subversive Sock Pattern

socks This simple sock pattern is one I use all the time to make soft & cozy socks for myself as well as rough & sturdy work socks for my husband. You can change the size by using smaller or larger needles and thinner or thicker yarn. You can change the style by using a different ribbing pattern for the leg. After you make a few pairs, you'll memorize the basic structure and techniques of sock making, and you should be able to add or remove stitches to adapt the basic pattern for using stitch patterns with different repeats. It's really easy to make a sock, but the isntructions look confusing. The only way to figure it out is to make one. If you don't want to make a pair as a test, use extra bulky yarn and fat needles and knit a Christmas stocking.


Tools and Materials

Yarn: 200 yards light worsted weight yarn.

One 560 yard skein of Toasty Toes superwash merino from Interlacements will make 2-3 pairs of socks, depending on how high you knit the leg portion. This yarn is so soft and cozy, it's like putting your foot into a cloud. I also like Hifa sock yarn for strong hiking socks because it has nylon spun in with the wool. It comes in 2- and 3-ply versions. I use the 2-ply for myself, and the 3-ply for super strong work socks for my husband.

Needles: One set of four or five double-pointed needles size 3 US (or size required to obtain gauge).

Notions: Blunt tapestry needle for weaving in ends and sewing toe.


Gauge

6 st = 1 inch (10 cm)

Knitting socks at a tighter gauge than normally recommended for the yarn creates a denser fabric that will be stronger than a looser fabric.

Because gauge is different when knit flat or in-the-round, use the beginning of the leg for your gauge swatch. If it’s right, you are that far ahead! If it’s wrong, just rip it out and start over. You haven’t spend more time knitting than if you’d knit a separate gauge swatch.


Size

Women’s medium (shoe size 6 ½ - 9).

Finished foot circumference = 8 in. Foot is knit to desired length.

  • To make a larger sock (9.5 in. around), use worsted-weight yarn and size 4 US needles to get a gauge of 5 sts = 1 in.
  • To make a smaller sock (6.75 in. around), use sport-weight or sock yarn and size 2 US needles to get a gauge of 7 sts = 1 in.


Stitches

Ribbring stitches (knit in-the-round)

Single rib: K1 P1 around for all rounds. (Multiple of 2 sts.)


Double rib: K2 P2 around for all rounds. (Multiple of 4 sts.)


Elastic rib: K3 P1 around for all rounds. (Multiple of 4 sts.)


Eyelet rib: (Multiple of 7 sts.)

Rounds 1, 2 and 4: K5, p2 around.

Round 3: K2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, p2. Repeat around.

Repeat rounds 1-4 for pattern.


Baby cable rib: (Multiple of 4 sts.)

Rounds 1, 2 and 4: P2, k2 around.

Round 3: P2, work 2-st twist. Repeat around.

Repeat rounds 1-4 for pattern.

Work 2-st twist as follows:

  • k2tog leaving the stitches on the left needle.
  • Knit the first stitch again, then slip both stitches off the needle.

Heel stitch (knit back-and forth)

Row 1 and all RS rows: (Sl 1, k1), repeat across.

Row 2 and all WS rows: S1, p across.

That is, on right side rows slip one, knit one, slip one, knit one, etc. (slip every other/odd stitch). Since you have an even number of stitches, you will end with a knit.

Then, on wrong side rows, slip the first stitch only, then purl across the rest of the row. The stitch you are slipping is the last knit stitch from the end of the previous row.


Instructions

Cast on 48 sts (round up or down a few sts if necessary for your pattern stitch multiple). Distribute evenly on three or four double-pointed needles. Join in round, being careful not to twist stitches.


Leg

Work in the ribbing stitch of your choice for 6 in., or desired length of leg minus 1 in. (2.5 cm).

If desired for a looser ankle, change to Stockinette stitch (St st). Work even for 1 in. (2.5 cm).

Heelheel

The heel is worked on half of the stitches:

Work across 12 sts, turn and work across 24 sts on the WS.

Place remaining 24 sts on holder to work later.

Work heel flap back and forth using heel stitch for 24 rows, or until heel makes a perfect square. End after working a WS row.


Turn heel

This is the curved part at the bottom of the heel. Don't forget to turn the heel or you won't be able to pick up sts properly for the instep. I forget this all the time, and then wonder why my sock looks so funny!

Row 1 (RS): Knit across 14 sts. SSK, k1, turn.

Row 2 (WS): Sl 1, p5, p2tog, p1, turn. (This creates a space between the stitches)

Row 3: Sl 1, knit to 1 st before space, ssk (stitch before and after space), k1, turn.

Row 4: Sl 1, p to 1 st before space, p2tog (stitch before and after space), p1, turn.

Repeat rows 3 and 4 until all heel stitches have been used up, end after working a WS row.

14 sts remain on heel.


Instep

Work in St st, or with the sts on the top of the foot continuing the ribbing from the leg. The sides of the instep and the sole are always worked in St st.

Knit across heel stitches. With same needle, pick up and knit 12 st from side of heel.

With second needle, work across 24 instep stitches (previously put on hold).

With third needle, pick up and knit 12 st from other side of heel, and knit across half of the heel stitches.

Round 1, dec 2 st as follows:

  • Knit to last 3 st on needle 1, k2tog, k1.
  • Work across all st on needle 2 for instep.
  • On needle 3, k1, ssk, knit to end of needle.

Round 2: Work even.

Repeat rounds 1 and 2 until 48 st remain.


Foot

Work even until piece measures 7 ½ in from heel, or 2 in. shorter than desired length.


Toe

Work in St st.

Round 1, dec 4 st as follows:

  • Knit to last 3 st on needle 1, k2tog, k1.
  • On needle 2, k1, ssk, knit to last 3 st, k2tog, k1.
  • On needle 3, k1, ssk, knit to end of needle.

Round 2: Knit

Work rounds 1 and 2 until 12 st remain.


Finishing

Cut yarn leaving and 18 in. tail.


Option 1: Gathered toetoe

Thread tail trough all st, pull tight and fasten off.


Option 2: Woven toe

Keep sole stitches on one needle, arrange instep stitches on second needle. Weave toe with kitchener stitch. Fasten off.

Weave in loose ends.

Posted by Donna at 7:11 AM
Categories: Patterns

Tuesday, November 29, 2005



Pattern: Holiday Teddy Bear Pattern

This holiday bear is easy enough even for beginning knitters. The pieces are knitted back and forth on straight needles and sewn together. With the furry yarn, you don't even have to worry about being good at finishing, because the seams don't show at all. I used a simple whip stitch on my bear and the stitches disappeared into the fur. Childproof eyes and nose make this an appropriate gift for children of any age.

For a holiday accent, I've also included a pattern for an easy sweater. It's knitted flat in once piece and joined at the sides and underarms after the knitting is complete. For Christmas, make the sweater in red and green. Use blue and white for Hannukah, red, green and black for Kwanza, or red, green and white for Winter Solstice. The choice is yours!


Bear

Materials

325 yards of faux fur yarn

I used 5 balls of Stars from Adriafil (50% viscose, 50% polyamide), 65 meters per 5 gram ball

Child proof eyes and nose (available at most craft and fabric stores)

Size 9 US needles

Small bag of fiberfill stuffing

12 inch dowel (optional)

Gauge

Approx 2 1/4 sts = 1 inch in stockinette stitch using a double strand of yarn

Don't worry too much about the gauge. If your fabric is dense enough so the stuffing won't peek out between the stitches, it's fine.


Size

Approx 19 inches tall


Instructions

Tip: tie a contrasting string onto the right side of the work because it's very difficult to see which is the knit side and which is the purl side with the furry yarn.

Use a double strand of yarn for all pieces.


Legs (make 2)

Cast on 10 sts.

Work in stockinette stitch (knit RS rows and purl WS rows). Knit in the front and back of the first and last stitch of every RS row until you have 14 sts.

Work even until leg measures approx 6 inches long.

Leave the first leg on the needle and work the second on the same needles. When you are finished with the second, line them up next to each other on one needle.


Body

Knit across the stitches of both legs (28 sts).

Work even until body measures approx 8 1/2 inches from the legs.

Bind off. Set body aside.


Arms (make 2)

Cast on 6 sts.

Work in stockinette stitch (knit RS rows and purl WS rows). Knit in the front and back of the first and last stitch of every RS row until you have 12 sts.

Work even until arm measures approx 7 inches long.

Bind off. Set arms aside.


Head (make 2 identical pieces)

Cast on 8 stitches.

Knit 1 row. Purl 1 row.

Knit in the front and back of the first and last stitch of every row until you have 16 sts.

Work even until head measures approx 4 inches.

Cast on 2 sts at the beginning of the next 2 rows for the ears (20 sts).

Work 6 rows in stockinette stitch on all 20 sts.

Work 4 rows back and forth on the first 8 sts.

K2tog across. Bind off the rem 4 sts. 12 sts remain.

Re-attach the yarn to the head just next to the completed ear. Bind off 4 sts. 8 sts remain.

Work 4 rows back and forth on the remaining 8 sts.

K2tog across. Bind off the rem 4 sts.


Finishing

Weave in the ends or tie them in knots and just hide them inside the bear.

Use a single strand of yarn for sewing.

Sew the center back seam of the body and the inside seams of the legs.

Stuff the legs lightly. Stuff the body. Manipulate the stuffing from the outside so the legs can bend and the bear can sit down. If desired, sew a few stitches between the legs and the body for a joint.

Stuff the arms lightly and sew them closed at the top. Sew the arms to the body.

Sew the two head pieces together. Stuff the ears lightly. Stuff the head. Manipulate the stuffing in the ears to there is an indentation in the center of each ear. Sew a few stitches going through both pieces of the ear and the stuffing to keep the indentation secure.

Squish the front of the bear's face in your hand to form a snout. Manipulate the stuffing to form slight indentations where the eyes will go. Attach the child proof eyes and nose to the bear's head. Squeeze the snout into shape gently, and sew a piece of yarn in and out around the snout to secure the shape. Tie the ends of the piece of yarn together and bury them inside the head.

If desired, insert the dowel into the body so it extends up into the head. This will make the head less floppy.

Sew the head to the body.

Bury all ends inside the bear.

Sweater

Materials

Assorted colors of worsted weight yarn. Appoximately 100 yards total will be more than enough.

I used Galway Worsted from Plymouth (100% wool), 210 yards per 100 gram ball


Gauge

4 sts = 1 inch in stockinette stitch


Size

7 inches long and 7 inches wide at the chest


Instructions

Cast on 30 sts. Work in stockinette stitch, making up a stripe pattern in your chosen colors as you go. The edge will roll up, just let this happen.

When the piece measures 3 inches from the bottom of the rolled edge, cast on 18 sts at the beginning of the next 2 rows for the sleeves (66 sts).

Work even until the sweater measures approx 6 3/4 inches long. End after working a WS row.

Neck row 1 (RS): Purl 24 sts, bind off 18 sts, purl 24 sts.

Neck row 2 (WS): Knit 24 sts, cast on 18 sts, knit 24 sts.

Return to stockinette stitch and work the back of the sweater in a solid color or continue to make up a stripe pattern. Work even until the sweater measures approx 4 inches from the neck. Bind off 18 sts at the beginning of the next 2 rows.

Continue working the body until the back is the same length as the front.

Bind off.


Finishing

Sew the side seams and underarm seams.

Weave in the ends and put the sweater on the bear.

Enjoy!

Posted by Donna at 8:00 AM
Categories: Patterns

Sunday, October 30, 2005



Pattern: Chemo Cap and Matching Scarf

This chemo cap and matching scarf are made out of ultra-soft alpaca and merino yarn. Any worsted-weight yarn can be used, but make sure you choose something soft and comfy. For warmer climates, a soft cotton or cotton-wool blend would be more comfortable than the alpaca. The hat is knitted in the round from the brim up on circular needles, changing to double-pointed needles for the crown. The scarf is knitted back and forth. The flower pin is made separately and can be worn as a brooch or as an accent on the cap or scarf.

Materials

Approx 550 yards of worsted weight yarn.

I used 5 balls of Suri Merino from Plymouth yarn (55% suri alpaca, 45% extra fine merino wool), Color 5192

To make each separate item, you will need:

Scarf: 3 balls, size 7 needles

Hat: 2 balls, size 7 circular needle 16-inches long and a set of 4 or 5 size 7 double-pointed needles

Flower pin: 1 ball, size 7 needles, pinback


Gauge

22 sts = 4 inches over 2x2 checks


Size

Hat: 18 inch circumference, fits head sizes up to 23 inches

Scarf: 7 inches wide x 46 inches long

Flower pin: 2 1/2 inches


Pattern Stitches

2x2 Ribbing

Row 1: (K2, p2) for entire round or row.

Repeat row 1 for pattern.

2x2 rib chart


2x2 Checks

Row 1 : (K2, p2), repeat across entire round or row.

Rows 2 and 4: Knit the knits and purl the purls.

Row 3: (P2, k2), repeat across entire round or row.

Repeat rows 1 through 4 for pattern.

2x2 check chart


Chemo Cap Instructions

With circular needle, loosely cast on 96 stitches. Place marker and join to knit in the round, being careful not to twist sts.

Work in 2x2 ribbing for 1 inch.

Work in 2x2 checks for 4 inches, or desired length to crown.

Work in 2x2 ribbing for 1 inch.


Crown

Note: change to double-pointed needles when the stitches no longer fit comfortably on the circular needle.

Decrease round 1: (K2, p2tog) around--72 sts.

Your ribbing is now k2, p1. Continue in pattern, knitting the knits and purling the purls, for 1 inch.

Decrease round 2: (K2tog, p1) around--48 sts.

Your ribbing is now k1, p1. Continue in pattern, knitting the knitts and purling the purls, for 1 inch.

Decrease round 3: K1, (k2tog) to last stitch, remove marker, k2tog--24 sts.

K2tog until 12 sts remain.

Cut yarn and draw tail through remaining stitches to fasten off. Weave in ends.


Scarf Instructions

Note: The first and last stitch of every row is knitted to create a neat garter-stitch edge.

Loosely cast on 40 sts.

Row 1: K1 (selvedge stitch), place marker, *k2, p2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k2, place marker, k1 (selvedge stitch).

Continue working 2x2 rib with garter-stitch edge stitch for 1 inch, slipping the markers when you come to them.

Change to 2x2 checks between edge stitches and work even for 11 inches.

Change to 2x2 rib between edge stitches and work even for 22 inches.

Change to 2x2 checks between edge stitches and work even for 11 inches.

Change to 2x2 rib between edge stitches and work even for 1 inch.

Bind off loosely and weave in ends.


Flower Pin Instructions

Cast on 12 stitches.

Row 1: Knit into the front and back of each stitch--24 stitches.

Row 2: Purl.

Row 3: Knit into the front and back of each stitch--48 stitches.

Row 4: Purl.

Row 5: Knit into the front and back of each stitch--96 stitches.

Row 6: Purl.

Bind off loosely. Form flower into a spiral shape with your fingers and use the yarn tails to sew the center of the flower together and to attach the pinback. Weave in ends.

Posted by Donna at 10:32 AM
Categories: Patterns



Pattern: Wire and Bead Brooch

wire brooch This easy-to-knit brooch is a great project for learning to knit with wire. I'd never knitted with wire myself before making this, and it took some time to get used to the feel of the wire as it wrapped around the needles to form the stitches. The wire has absolutely no give, and the stitches do not relax into a flowing fabric after you are finished. It was a very interesting experience, and I look forward to trying some more complex wire projects in the future. The materials are available in most beading and craft shops.


Materials

1 spool of Artistic Wire (26 gauge, 15 yards), Pink

Approx 350 seed beads (11/0), Pink

Size 0 metal knitting needles

Small pinback


Gauge

6 sts = approx 7/8 inch


Size

Ribbon approx 7/8 inch wide

Brooch approx 2 inches wide x 4 1/2 inches tall

For a smaller brooch, cast on fewer stitches and make the ribbon the desired length.


Instructions

Tip: As you work, unwind about a yard of wire and secure it in the notch on the side of the spool. If you let the wire unwind freely, it will tangle.

String the beads on to the wire.

Cast on 6 sts. The backwards loop cast on is easiest when working with wire.

Slide a bead up to the work, then knit one stitch. Continue in this manner, kinitting every row and sliding a bead up to the wire before each stitch, until the knitted ribbon measures approx 9 1/2 inches long.

Bind off or cut the wire and weave the end in and out of the open stitches to secure them. Weave in the ends and clip the wire close to the knitting.

Using the photo as a guide, form the ribbon into shape for the brooch. Cut a piece of wire approx 3 inches long.

Insert the wire from back to front, and then from front to back to secure the ribbon so it retains its shape. Using the ends of this piece of wire, attach the pinback to the back of the brooch. Wrap the ends of the wire around a few stitches on the wrong side, then clip the ends.

Pin the brooch onto your favorite sweater or felted bag. Enjoy!

Posted by Donna at 10:30 AM
Categories: Patterns

Saturday, September 24, 2005



Pattern: Knit Your Mind Felted Bag

Because it's Banned Books Week, I've designed this felted bag to use to carry my book with me, and to promote free speech and the First Amendment.

FeltedBagFront FeltedBagBack  

For those who are not familiar with the United States Constitution, the First Amendment reads, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

This bag allows you to speak your mind visually, by incorporating an intarsia motif representing something you are passionate about. I've included several charts that illustrate my own passions, but you can easily substitute another design.

This is the chart I used on my bag. It means "straight but not narrow" and I'm proud to carry it in support of my gay and lesbian friends who are facing so much discrimination and hate these days.

PeaceSignChart

This peace sign chart speaks for itself. I believe war should always be the last resort, only considered after every other option is exhausted. I also believe that starting a war is always immoral.

VDayChart

This chart is my adaption of the logo from Eve Ensler's V-Day web site, promoting a global movement to stop violence against women and girls.

If you've never read or listened to Eve's Vagina Monologues, you really should. It's educational, enlightening, and entertaining. If you're a woman and you haven't been able to enjoy your sexuality, Eve's message will set you free.

FeministChart

The classic feminist symbol, promoting equal rights for all women. "Feminism is the Radical Notion that Women are People."

RainbowChart

In 1978, Gilbert Baker of San Francisco designed and made a flag with six stripes representing the six colors of the rainbow as a symbol of gay and lesbian community pride. Slowly the flag took hold, offering a colorful and optimistic alternative to the more common pink triangle symbol. Today it is recognized by the International Congress of Flag Makers, and is flown in lesbian and gay pride marches worldwide. Read more.

skullchart

Julius Lester, a Newberry award winning children's author, keeps a human skull on his desk to remind him that we are all alike underneath our superficial differences. In his memoir, On Writing for Children and Other People, he says that in our "skullness," we "exist beyond and separate from defintions of gender, race, and all the socio-political definitions which hang from our limbs and rattle like the chains of Jacob Marley's ghost." What a great writer!

Size

Approx 11 inches wide x 12 inches tall before felting

Approx 8 1/2 inches wide x 10 inches tall after felting

Needles

Size 11 U.S. straight and 2 double-pointed needles

Yarn

Color A: Approx 200 yards of worsted or bulky weight yarn in a solid color

Color B: Approx 100 yards of worsted or bulky weight in a contrasting color, or the colors used in your selected chart

Tip: For a larger bag, use a double strand of worsted-weight yarn, and size 13 needles. The peace bag was made with a single strand of yarn on size 11 needles; the skull bag was made with a double strand of yarn on size 13 needles.

I used Plymouth Galway Worsted (100% Wool - Worsted Weight, 5 sts = 1"/US8 needle / 210 yds/100g ball).

Gauge

Approx 3 sts = 1 inch over stockinette stitch (knit 1 row, purl 1 row) before felting

Instructions

This bag is knit back-and-forth from the bottom up, using Intarsia color work. The bag is felted after the knitting is complete. See this month's lessons if you are unfamiliar with either of these techniques.

With color A, cast on 67 stitches.

Work 6 rows in stockinette stitch (knit 1 row, purl 1 row).

Change to color B. Work 4 rows in stockinette stitch.

Change to color A. Work 4 rows in stockinette stitch.

Next row (RS), set up chart patterns. Knit 22 sts, place marker, work 23 sts of chart, place marker, knit 22 sts.

Continue following chart and working in stockinette stitch until all rows of chart have been worked. Slip the markers whenever you come to them.

Change to color A. Work 4 rows in stockinette stitch.

Change to color B. Work 4 rows in stockinette stitch.

Change to color A. Work 6 rows in stockinette stitch. Bind off.

Finishing

Fold bag in half and sew center back seam.

Fold bag so seam is in center back, and sew bottom seam.

Straps (make 2)

With color A and double-pointed needles, cast on 3 sts. Work in I-cord as follows, until strap measures approx 16 inches.

*K3, do not turn. Slide sts to other end of double-pointed needle. Repeat from *.

When strap is desired length, bind off.

Sew straps to bag, weave in ends, and felt in washing machine.

Posted by Donna at 12:07 PM
Categories: Patterns