« Ideas for Charity Knitting | Main | Patterns »

Monday, April 30, 2007

Lesson: Single Crochet Edging

Working a single crochet edging along a piece of knitting is quite easy -- if you already know how to crochet. If not, it could take some practice. Should you decide you don't like to crochet, an easy knitted substitute is as follows: With RS facing, pick up sts along the entire edge of the knitted piece. If desired, purl 1 WS row. Bind off loosely.

To work a single crochet edge:

1) Insert the crochet hook in the first stitch on the far right edge of the knitted piece. Pull up a loop of yarn. 1 loop is on the hook.

2) Wrap the yarn around the crochet hook (see figure below), and pull the yarn through the loop that is already on the hook. 1 loop remains on the hook. This attaches the yarn to the knitting.

Note: Wrapping the yarn around the hook is called "yarn over" in many crochet patterns. This is a different motion than a yarn over in knitting. Make sure the hook is pointing down toward the bottom of the work to make it easier to pull it through the stitch.

3) Insert the hook into the next stitch to the left (see figure below). Pull up a loop of yarn. 2 loops are now on the hook.

4) Wrap the yarn around the crochet hook (see figure below). Pull the yarn through both loops that are on the hook. 1 loop remains on the hook and 1 single crochet stitch has been completed.

Repeat steps 3 and 4 along the entire edge of the knitting. If you want to work around a corner, you can keep going. Just work 3 single crochet stitches in the corner stitch. Fasten off the last stitch and weave in the ends.

Just as when you are picking up stitches, you have to get the right number of sts crocheted for the edge to be flat and smooth. If the edge pulls in, you need to work more crochet stitches, closer together. If the edge ruffles and flares out, you need to work fewer crochet stitches, skipping some knit stitches if necessary. In addition, everyone has a different crochet gauge, so you may need to try going up or down a hook size to get the desired results.

Posted by Donna at 6:54 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Lesson: KTBL or Twisting Stitches

Have you ever seen the instruction ktbl or k2tog-tbl and wonder what, exactly "tbl" means? Ktbl stands for "knit through back loop." Just as "pick up" and "pick up and knit" are somewhat confusing terminology, "knit through the back loop" can also be confusing, because each knit stitch has only one loop on the needle. So what exactly does this abbreviation mean?

Ktbl actually means to knit a stitch through the back of the loop, that is, to knit through the leg of the stitch that is sitting behind the needle.

Here's an extreme closeup of a standard knit stitch. Pick up some of your own knitting and insert the needle into the stitch to knit. See how you are putting the needle into the part of the stitch that is sitting in front of the left needle? Look at the photo below and notice how this opens up the stitch. When you look at the finished piece of knitting (there's a swatch below), notice how the little knit stitches look like rows of Vs.

knit standard

Now, here's an extreme close up of knitting "through the back loop" aka "ktbl". See how the right needle is inserted into the part of the stitch that is behind the left needle? Look closely at the stitch and notice how it is different than the stitch above. Instead of being opened up, the legs of the stith are being crossed, creating an X at the bottom of the stitch. If you look at the swatch below, you can see how each of the stitches makes a small X instead of a V. Recently when I was teaching a knitting class in Alaska, one of the students gave me a great way to remember this stitch. She said, "You can tell when a stitch has been knitted through the back loop, because the stitch looks like it has to go potty." I bet you'll never forget that now!

ktbl

So, why would you ever want to knit a stitch through the back loop and twist it? I use this techniqe in ribbing to create a more structured and tidy looking ribbing. I usually knit ribbing too loose and my stitches look sloppy. But when I twist the stitches in the ribbing, the pattern is much neater.

st st swatch This swatch shows two different stitch patterns:

Top: Standard Stockinette stitch

Bottom: Twisted Stockinette stitch











rib swatch This swatch shows two different versions of ribbing:

Top: Standard k1, p1 ribbing

Bottom: Twisted k1, p1 ribbing (*ktbl, p1; rep from *)

The differences between these swatches looks subtle, but the texture and flexibility of the fabric can change drastically when a lot of stitches are twisted.

Some knitters cross their stitches without realizing that they are knitting in an unusual fashion. There are times when you want to knit twisted stitches intentionally, but it can create undesirable results when you are twisting stitches by accident. Twisted stitches are tighter than standard stitches, and they create a fabric that is stiffer than plain knitting. This can ruin the drape of a sweater and it can also prevent a piece of knitting from felting. Felting requires loose stitches that move around during agitation, and if you've knitted a piece with twisted stitches, you may find that it does not felt to the desired size, and that the felted fabric shows up the shape of the stitches, even after prologned agitation in a washing machine.

Posted by Donna at 3:41 PM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Lesson: Tips for Knitting with Mohair

Although this month's comfort shawl pattern is very easy to knit, working with mohair yarn can be a challenge.

Because the yarn is so fuzzy and the fibers are clingy, the yarn will stick to itself as you knit, making it almost impossible to rip out. If you do have to rip, slowly unknit the piece stitch by stitch, using a sharp scissor to separate the furry halo if it gets stuck together. But be careful not to cut the core of the yarn! Pay special attention at the beginning of each row. For some reason, the fibers tend to stick together most where each new row begins.

To avoid frustrating mistakes, make sure you knit slowly and pay attention. Even though this shawls uses very easy stitch patterns, you might find that you need a marker inside the 2 edge stitches so you don't forget to to work the YOs at the beginning of each row. These are the increases that give the shawl its triangular shape and add a small, but noticeable detail to the edges.

When binding off, make sure to work very loosely. Because the mohair yarn is held together by a nylon thread, it does not stretch at all. If your bind off is not loose, the shawl will have a hard, puckering edge that will spoil the soft, cloud-like feeling. If you don't have a needle bigger than a size 15 for binging off. Use this stretchy bind off instead of your regular technique.

One nice thing about working with mohair is that, should you make a mistake here or there, it will be impossible to notice in the fuzzy texture of the finished knitting.

Keep these few things in mind, and you'll learn to enjoy knitting with this luxuriously warm and lightweight yarn.

Posted by Donna at 6:08 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Sunday, November 26, 2006



Lesson: Stretchy Bind Off

This easy bind off is perfect for lace, sweater necks, and the cuffs of socks or mittens that have been knitted from the toe up or fingers down. I use it all the time because I tend to bind off tighly and using a larger needle doesn't seem to help very much.

To work the stretchy bindoff:

K2, *insert the left needle into the front of the 2 sts on the right needle and knit them together--1 st remains on right needle. K1, repeat from * until all sts have been bound off.

Fasten off last stitch.

Posted by Donna at 6:57 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons



Lesson: Blocking Lace

Everyone wants to know how to block lace, as if it's some deep, dark secret or incredibly difficult like rocket science. Actually, it's quite easy. If you've never blocked lace before, you can try this on a swatch if you're a little nervous.

Blocking Wool or Other Natural Fibers

You need:

Blocking wires and/or rust proof pins. I use both, depending on the project and my mood. You need hundreds of pins if you are using them exclusively. You need about ten or so if you are using them to secure blocking wires in place.

A blocking board or flat surface with straight lines. I use a cutting board made for sewing. It is cardboard, folds up neatly for storage, and has a 1" grid printed on it, making it easy to get straight edges.

To block a lace scarf or shawl:

1) Soak the finished item in tepid water until it is thoroughly wet. This could take a half-hour or more, so be patient. When you first put the item in the water, you'll notice that it floats. That's because so much air is trapped inside the fibers. When it gets saturated, it will sink below the surface of the water and become a darker color.

2) Place the item on the blocking surface, and stretch it into shape. Use the pins to secure the knitting in place, or put the blocking wires in the edges and use the pins to secure the wires in place.

  • If you're using pins, start by pinning the corners, then place pins at the center of each side. Then, keep dividing each section in half and adding more pins until the edge is straight and even.
  • If you're using blocking wires, run the wires through the stitches at the very edge of the piece.
  • If your item has a scalloped edge, secure each point with the pins or wires. If your item has a straight edge, you need to pin or run the wires through almost every other row. Basically, you need to secure the item in enough places so the edge is smooth and straight, instead of jagged and sloppy looking.

3) Leave the item to dry thoroughly--overnight in dry areas and for at least 24 hours in wet climates. Even though it might seem like it dries faster, leaving it for a longer amount of time ensures that it is completely dry and helps to set the block so the item won't shrink up after you unpin it.

Here's a picture of a scarf being blocked by the Oomingmak knitters in Alaska. You can see that it has been stretched a good deal to open up the lace pattern and to help the fabric drape softly. You can also see how many pins it takes to make a straight edge!

blocking lace

Blocking Acrylic

You need:

Blocking wires and/or rust proof pins, a cotton dish towel or a piece of cotton fabric, and an iron.

In Arctic Lace, I mentioned that you can't knit lace with acrylic yarns because they won't keep their shape when blocked. This is true if you follow the procedure above.

However, when I went to the Boise Lace Knitting retreat a couple of months ago, one of the other attendees, Pat Stevens, proved me wrong. Here's her technique for "killing" acrylic yarn to give it a gorgeous drape.

Wet your knitting, spin it out in a washer. Lay a sheet on the carpet. Pin the piece exactly the size you want. (I stretch my lace shoulder warmers pretty hard.) Lay a wet cotton dish towel or piece of fabric over it. With a hot iron press down all over the thing. Don't iron just press. I press until the top cloth is very dry. Then I leave it overnight to finish drying. It's that easy. I really press it a lot, it's the steam heat that makes the acrylic look and drape like rayon. You may want to knit a large swatch and test it out.

Edited to add this note in response to a question a reader sent me in email: Acrylic yarn gets "killed" by the application of the heat and it will remain dead after future washings and retain its new shape. You should only have to do this treatment once, as far as I can tell, whereas you normally have to reblock lace knitted in wool or other natural fibers after each washing.

Here's another tip that just arrived in my email from Renee' Wells, whom I also met at the Boise Lace Knitting Retreat (Renee' teaches some great classes on Japanese knitting and if you ever have a chance to take one of them, don't miss it!):

This can also be done dry. Sometimes I place the item on a towel with a wet cloth above. Press and then gently stretch the item into the new shape. You can pick up the cloth between wettings and see where more pressing is needed to even it out. The advantage to this method is greater stretch. You must be careful not to let the item hang over the ironing board it you are trying it there. The weight will skew the shape. I often kill acrylic baby blankets, they morph into lovely exotic feeling fibers! No longer just acrylic! And the mums that receive them use them over and over because they do hold their new drape.

Blocking Fitted Garments

To block lace for a garment, pin the pieces out to the specified dimensions. Do not stretch or pin ribbing, or it will loose its elasticity.

Posted by Donna at 6:54 AM
Edited on: Monday, November 27, 2006 10:22 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Sunday, May 28, 2006



Lesson: Knitting Lace

Knitting lace can be intimidating because lace projects are often made with fine yarns on tiny needles, using intricate charted patterns. But lace can be easy, too. It can be made out of heavy yarns, on large needles, with simple stitches that can be memorized after just a few rows.

Lace uses the same basic techniques and stitches as other styles of knitting; however, there are many ways to knit, purl, increase, and decrease and not all are appropriate for knitting lace. These are the techniques that I've found work best. I knit Continental style, so these pictures show me carrying the yarn in my left hand. The instructions are the same if you carry the yarn in your right hand.

The Knit Stitch (K)

The basic knit stitch works perfectly in lace knitting.

1. With the working yarn in back of the needle, insert the right needle under the left needle and into the first stitch from front to back.

2. Wrap the working yarn around the right needle counter-clockwise.

3. Pull the yarn through the loop on the left needle.

4. Drop the old stitch from the left needle. You now have one new knit stitch on the right needle.

The Purl Stitch (P)

Not all purl stitches are created equal, because some turn the stitches around on the needles. I learned one of these unusual purls from my grandmother, and it was decades before I figured out why I couldn't follow any instructions for lace stitches. The following purl stitch situates the stitches on the needle in the correct orientation for lace.

1. With the working yarn in front of the left needle, insert the right needle into the first stitch from back to front.

2. Wrap the working yarn around the right needle counter clockwise. (If you hold the yarn in your left hand, dip your index finger behind the needle to wrap the yarn.)

3. Pull the yarn through.

4. Drop the old stitch from the left needle. You now have one new purl stitch on the right needle.

Yarn Over (YO)

A Yarn Over adds a hole to your knitting. This is what creates the lacy texture. A yarn over also increases, or adds an extra stitch to your knitting. Every yarn over must be matched up to a corresponding decrease or the number of stitches will not stay the same.

1. Bring the yarn between the needles to the front, and then over the needle again to the back of the work to begin the next knit stitch. (If the next stitch is a purl, bring the yarn to the front once again, between the two needles).

2. Work the next stitch as called for in the instructions or chart. (Photo shows a regular knit stitch following a yarn over).

On the next row, work the yarn over as a regular knit or purl stitch.

Decreases (dec)

The last thing you need to know to knit lace is how to make decreases. There are many different types of decreases used in lace, and each pattern should explain the types of decreases that are required. Some decreases slant toward the left, and others slant toward the right. Some turn two stitches into one stitch, and others turn three stithces into one stitch. Lace designers are very picky about the decreases they use, to get just the right look. So always follow the decreasing instructions exactly as given unless you are a very experienced lace knitter.

Posted by Donna at 8:21 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Wednesday, February 22, 2006



Lesson: Double Knitting

Double knitting is a very easy technique to master, even though is sounds difficult and looks like magic. You use two straight needles to knit back and forth, but you end up with a tube of knitting. It's a great technique to make a double thick fabric for a yoga mat or rug, and it's also a cool way to make a pillow, hat, or bag. I used the technique in the condom amulets because I didn't want to use double-pointed needles for such a small project and I was too lazy to sew seams.

1. Cast on an even number of stitches.

2. Work every row as follows: *Knit 1 st, slip 1 st as if to purl with yarn in front. Rep from * to end of row. Turn.

That's it! Every two rows across makes one round of knitting. You are basically knitting half of the stitches on each pass. Be very careful to put the yarn in front when you slip the stitches, or you won't have an open tube. The yarn has to be in between the two layers of fabric when you slip the stitches.

I bet you thought this would be harder, didn't you?

If you lose count, it's very easy to find your place if you're using plain yarn (don't try this technique with furry yarn until you practice on smooth wool or cotton first).

Knit the first stitch and the stitches that look like Vs. These are the knits on the RS of the fabric:

Slip the 2nd stitch and the stitches that look like bumps. These stitches are hidden between the knit stitches after the first couple of rows:

3. To cast off:

If you want a double thick layer of fabric that doesn't open on the end:

  • Bind off normally.

If you want an open tube for a hat or a bag or for a pillow that you'll stuff:

  • Either slip the front sts to one double-pointed needle and the back sts to a second, or just pull the needle out and rearrange the stitches so the front stitches are on one needle and the back sts on a second.
  • Using a thrid needle, bind off the sts on the front needle, turn.
  • Bind off the sts on the back needle.

Posted by Donna at 6:45 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Sunday, January 08, 2006



Lesson: Making Cables

Cables are made when stitches in the knitted fabric cross over each other. You place a few stitches on hold by slipping them onto a cable needle, knit the next two or three stitches, then knit the stitches off of the cable needle. These traveling stitches may move to the right or to the left.

Cable needles are short, double-pointed needles made especially for the purpose of knitting cables. They usually have a notch, ridges, or a curved section to keep the stitches from falling off while you are manipulating the cable.

To make a left-crossing cable, you hold the cable needle in the front.

Crossing a four-stitch cable to the left:

1. Slip the next 2 stitches onto the cable needle and hold the cable needle in front of the work.

2. Knit next 2 stitches from left needle.

3. Knit the 2 stitches from the cable needle.

left cable

To make a right-crossing cable, you hold the cable needle in the back.

Crossing a four-stitch cable to the right:

1. Slip the next 2 stitches onto the cable needle and hold the cable needle in back of the work.

2. Knit next 2 stitches from left needle.

3. Knit the 2 stitches from the cable needle.

right cable

Posted by Donna at 8:21 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Tuesday, November 29, 2005



Lesson: Sewing Seams

A lot of knitters are afraid of sewing seams, but it's actually quite simple once you learn when to use each type of sewing technque. Here are the three that I use most frequently.


Whip Stitch Seam

Whip stitch is an easy seam that can be used anytime you have a furry yarn where the stitches won't show.

1. With the right or wrong sides of the fabric facing up (your choice), place the two pieces to be seamed on a flat surface.

2. With a tapestry needle and matching, use one smooth motion to catch the stitch on the edge of one piece of knitting and then catch a stitch on the other piece.

3. Continue along the seam, pulling gently on the yarn to close the seam after each stitch.


Mattress Stitch Seam

Mattress stitch is an invisible seam that is sewn on the RS of the knitting.

1. With the right sides facing up, place the two pieces to be seamed on a flat surface.

2. With a tapestry needle and matching yarn, go under the bar between first and second stitches near the edge of one piece of knitting

3. Repeat step 2 on the other piece.

4. Continue to work from side to side, pulling gently on the yarn to close the seam after every few stitches.

After you gently tighten the stitches, they will disappear completely between the two pieces of knitting (not shown here). Don't pull the seam too tight, you you will create a weak point. The seam should be at similar tension to the knitting.


Edge to Edge Seam

This seam is used to join cast-on or bound-off edges.

1. With the right sides of the fabric facing up, place the two pieces to be seamed on a flat surface.

2. With a tapestry needle and matching yarn, catch the knit V just inside the edge of one piece of knitting.

3. Repeat step 2 on the other piece.

4. Continue to work from side to side, pulling gently on the yarn to close the seam after each stitch.

The seam should be at the same tension as your knitting, and look like a row of stockinette stitch.

Posted by Donna at 7:19 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Sunday, October 30, 2005



Lesson: The Purl Stitch

The purl stitch is the second main stitch in knitting. It is essentially a knit stitch worked on the wrong side of the work. The purl stitch creates a bump on the front and a V on the back. Purl is abbreviated P or p in knitting patterns.

If you're a new knitter and you've never purled before, here's a quick lesson. The photos show the yarn held in the left hand, but the instructions are the same for both English (right hand carry) and Continental (left hand carry) knitting.

1. With the working yarn in front of the needles, insert the right needle into the first stitch from back to front.

Purl

2. Wrap the working yarn around the right needle counter clockwise.

Purl2

3. Pull the yarn through.

Purl3  

4. Drop the old stitch from the left needle. You now have one new purl stitch on the right needle.

Posted by Donna at 10:25 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Saturday, September 24, 2005



Lesson: Felting

Felt is a thick, matted fabric created by applying moisture, heat, and agitation to yarn from certain natural animal fibers such as 100% wool or a blend of wool and mohair. Machine washable wool (“superwash”), cotton, silk, and man-made fibers will not felt, but can be used along with a strand of wool to create interesting textures.

Here are some tips for planning a felting project:

  • Yarn – choose a yarn that is lighter in weight than what the pattern calls for (because it will thicken up when you felt it), and make sure it is “feltable.”
  • Gauge – work the design at a very loose gauge so the stitches are light and airy. You should be able to see space between the stitches. If your stitches are too tight, the piece may not felt well.
  • Swatch first – it’s always better to experiment with felting on a small piece than to spend weeks or months working on a project only to be disappointed with the way it comes out of the washer.

To felt a knitted item, put it in a zippered pillow case (to catch the lint) and toss it in the washing machine. Set the machine for the smallest load size with hot wash, cold rinse, and heavy-duty agitation. Add a couple of tablespoons of laundry detergent or no-rinse wool soap, and turn on the machine.

Check the felting every five minutes. Some yarns will felt within the first few minutes, while others may take two or three cycles. When the fibers are matted and you don’t want the item to shrink any more, take it out and gently rinse it in tepid water in the sink. Roll the rug in a towel and squeeze out the excess water.

You can also let the rug continue to shrink and go through the rinse and spin cycles in the machine. Some people report that this results in permanent creases in the felt, but I have never seen this happen.

Posted by Donna at 10:03 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons



Lesson: Intarsia

The knitting technique used to create large blocks of color is called intarsia.

Each color is worked with a separate ball of yarn, and the yarns are crossed at the color change to lock the sections together.

Tip: when working small motifs, wind off a small amount of yarn for each color area and let them hang loose at the back of your work. If the yarns get tangled, you can easily separate them if they are not attached to balls.

To make change colors in the middle of a row:

1. With the first color, knit up to the color change, then drop the first color.

2. Pick up the second color, crossing the yarn underneath the first color, and work the first stitch tightly.

IntarsiaWS

3. Give the end of the old color a slight tug to lock the colors together, then continue knitting with the second color.

Posted by Donna at 9:56 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Sunday, August 14, 2005



Lesson: Knitting in the Round

Knitting in the round is quite easy, and many people love it so much they never knit back and forth once they try circular knitting. It eliminates the need to sew seems, which can be an added bonus if you don't like finishing.

The only hard part about knitting in the round is getting started. You have to get the stitches onto the needles and join them into a circle without twisting them.

When working on circular needles, cast on then place the needles on a flat surface and make sure all of the stitches are lined up on the inside of the curve of the needles. With the tail and the working yarn on the right needle, pick up the needles carefully, and knit the first couple of stitches. This joins the knitting into a circle. Just knit around and around and around. You can use the yarn tail to keep track of the beginning of the round (as I do), or you can put a little plastic marker onto the needle and slip it every time you come to it.

Knitting with double-pointed needles (dpns) is not very different, but it is slightly more cumbersome until you get used to it. In fact, switching needles as you progress around becomes part of the rhythm of knitting.

When working on dpns, cast on then divide the stiches evenly onto 3 or 4 needles. Do this by just slipping the stitches from one needle to another. You can put your work on 4 needles and knit with the fourth (my preference and common in the United States) or you can put your work on 4 needles and knit with the fifth (common in Europe). If you've never used double-pointed needles before, try both setups to see which is most comfortable for you.

Place the needles on a flat surface and make sure all of the stitches are lined up on the inside of the triangle or square formed by the needles. With the tail and the working yarn on the right needle, pick up the needles carefully, and knit the first couple of stitches. This joins the knitting into a circle.

If you are new to circular knitting, I suggest you try a project on circular needles first. A hat is a good project, because you have to switch to double pointed needles when you knit the crown. Because you already have the rest of the hat knitted, switching from circular to double-pointeds is easy, and you only have to knit a few rows on the mutliple needles. When you are ready to switch, pick up one dpn and knit 1/4 to 1/3 of the stitches. Pick up another dpn and knit the second batch. Continue until all of the sts have been knitted onto 3 or 4 dpns and the round is complete.

To start the next round, take another empty dpn and knit all of the sts off of the first needle. The first needle is now empty. Use this needle to knit the stitches off of the second needle. Keep going in this manner.

Posted by Donna at 10:57 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons

Saturday, May 14, 2005



Lesson: Learn to Knit

Lesson: Learn to Knit

Garter stitch is the easiest stitch in knitting. In this lesson, you’ll learn everything you need to know to make a garter stitch scarf and hat.

Holding the Yarn and Needles

There are many ways to hold the yarn and needles in knitting, but the Continental method is the one I prefer. It works well for both right- and left-handed knitters.

Hold the working yarn (the yarn attached to the ball) in your left hand. To control the tension, wrap the yarn around your index finger several times. Drop a wrap from your finger whenever you need more yarn to complete a stitch.

holding the yarn

Casting On

The backwards-loop cast on is the easiest way to get stitches onto the needles for new knitters.

1. Make a loop with your thumb.

thumb loop

2. Insert the needle into the loop, remove your thumb, and pull the loop gently so it tightens around the needle.

For practice, cast on about 24 stitches.

The Knit Stitch

Now that you have stitches on a needle, you can begin knitting.

1. Hold the needle with the stitches in your left hand and the empty needle in your right hand. With the working yarn in back of the left needle, insert the right needle under the left needle and into the first stitch from front to back.

knit stitch step 1

2. Move the tip of the right needle behind the working yarn from right to left, then bring it to the front again to catch the yarn.

knit stitch step 1

3. Pull the yarn through the loop on the left needle.

knit stitch step 3

4. Drop the old stitch from the left needle.

5. You now have one new stitch on the right needle. Repeat until all of the stitches are on the right needle.

6. Turn to start a new row. Put the full needle in your left hand and the empty needle in your right. Make sure to bring the working yarn under the needle to the back as you start each new row. If you bring the yarn over the needle to the back, you may accidentally add an extra stitch.

For practice, knit until your swatch is about 4 inches long.

Binding Off

When you’re finished knitting, you need to bind off the last row of stitches.

The decrease bind off is worked two stitches at a time, with each stitch being put back on the left needle after it is knit. Make sure to work the bind off row loosely. Use larger needles if necessary.

1. Knit two stitches together: insert the needle through two loops on the left hand needle at once, and work them together as one stitch.

knit two stitches together

2. Move the new stitch on the right needle back onto the left needle.

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 until there is only one loop left on the needle.

Cut the working yarn from the ball, leaving a few inches for weaving in. Take the last loop off of the needle, and pull the end of the yarn through the loop. Tug gently to tighten.

Congratulations! With what youv'e learend. you can make the Garter Stitch Scarf and Origami Hat.

Posted by Donna at 9:27 AM
Categories: Knitting Lessons